Category: Pet Feeder

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To Breed (Spay) or Not to Breed (Spay)?

Written on August 23, 2020 in Pet Feeder

I am a mid-20’s wife and mother of three small children, a dog, and a cat. Recently, I had the unpleasant experience of returning home to find my dog breeding with a wolf in my living-room. She will be spayed as soon as the pups are weaned, and they will be sterilized (with health certificates) before they are placed with families. Those that are not placed will remain with us. I am interested in breeding, but I have never owned a pedigree dog before. Can you recommend some good family breeds? Also, do you think there may be problems with my dog reacting negatively? She has never been unfriendly to any animals.

I will answer your last question first. Your female may of course be protective of her pups and their environment. Generally the mother tends to become more protective as the pups become more mobile and this can carry on for a while after they are weaned. If you keep some pups, this protectiveness may extend to an even longer period. However, some bitches are pretty easy going and may show no such signs, even to the extent of letting their favorite pals visit with the pups. Now see below for a discussion on “breeding dogs”.

There are many considerations in both of these cases of “casual” breeding. There is only one good reason to breed a dog: improving the selected breed. In other words, breeding a dog to calm her down, so that kids can see the miracle of birth (don’t forget they may also see the horror of dead puppies, and to not let them see the whole range is a disservice to them), or because it seems like a good thing to try out, are NOT GOOD REASONS!

To be a good breeder, you must have a passion for a particular breed; you must understand its characteristics and know how you would like to make improvements; and last of all, you must already have a mental image of the “perfect” dog in your mind, and breed to that image. You must be prepared to put puppies to sleep, or even an entire litter if something goes very wrong. It’s more than a hobby, it’s many years’ worth of dedication. Their is great joy, but lots of disappointments and heartbreak as well; most “breeders” don’t last 5 years. So for me to suggest a breed for a potential breeder, or to encourage breeding a dog that is less than superior, would not make sense.

However, if you do intend to breed, then read my 10 Commandments for a New Breeder which I’ll repeat here:

  1. Call the national club of the ONE breed you like to get names of excellent breeders that you can talk to and learn from. 
  2. Get a copy of the breed standard from the AKC, study it and understand it. 
  3. Get several books on the breed you have selected, and study them. 
  4. Go to dog shows to meet both dogs and breeders. Talk to them, but more importantly, listen to them. Watch the judging of the breed and find out why the winners are winners and the losers are losers. 
  5. If you still want to go ahead with this breed, buy the BEST bitch you can from an excellent breeder. 
  6. Show your bitch at the shows and learn all you can about her qualities and faults. 
  7. Get advice from experienced breeders about studs that will complement your bitch. 
  8. Be prepared to spend more money than you anticipated. 
  9. Never compromise on temperament and quality, i.e., be ruthless in selecting which pups you will keep from any litter, if any, right until they are of proven quality. 
  10. If your litters consistently produce pups that are of a higher quality than the parents, congratulate yourself and your mentors, you are on your way to success.

Think about it,

Breeding a pet can be a personal choice and brings along with itself different responsibilities. If encountering confusion, one should always consult a vet to know about the pros and cons and other details to prepare for the best. Researching and understanding can sometimes be the best way to conclude.

Dog Health Care Insurance Info And Facts

Written on August 20, 2020 in Pet Feeder

We dog owners are devoted to our animals. If our dogs need medical care, we rush them to the veterinarian’s office. Money is no object — most of us would beg, borrow, or steal to pay for our dogs to get the care they need. With dog health care insurance, you can have peace of mind that you will always be able to afford an office visit to the veterinarian. Dog Health Care Insurance Coverage

Petfirst Healthcare is one of the most popular dog health care insurance providers around today. When you have dog health care insurance with Petfirst, up to 90% of your visits to the vet for routine treatment and illnesses is covered. That’s right, you pay only 10% of your pet’s office visits for routine care. All the dog health care insurance plans that Petfirst offers include $220 per year of routine care coverage. For most dogs, this will easily cover their wellness care, exams, and vaccinations. What is Deductible and Co-pay?

With Petfirst, as with most dog health care insurance plans, there is no deductible for routine visits. When your dog needs care for an accident or illness, you pay a deductible of just $50 per incident. When was the last time you paid just $50 for your pet’s accident or illness treatment? Once you pay your $50 deductible, your health care insurance with Petfirst pays 90% of your dog’s medical expenses for the rest of its treatment for that incident. My Dog Is Older – Can He Get an Insurance Policy Too?

Most dog insurance plans, Petfirst included, offer coverage for all dogs younger than ten years of age. If you buy insurance before your dog’s tenth birthday, the insurance is renewable for your dog’s entire life. Think about all the money you will save on veterinary bills and medications when you pet starts getting treatment for diseases and disorders associated with old age. With a dog health care insurance in place, you can have all your dog’s ailments treated without worrying about the cost. In addition, there are also lots of affordable products in the market. You just have to make sure that it is reliable, effective and recommended by the vet. To help you learn more of these products, you can visit https://www.labroots.com/trending/cannabis-sciences/18078/cbd-helps-dogs-osteoarthritis-stay-active

Not only do you receive reimbursement for your out-of-pocket veterinary expenses for your dog’s accident, illness, and preventive medical care, most insurers offer other benefits that every dog owner will appreciate. If your dog is lost or stolen, insurance covers the cost of “lost dog” advertisements – and pays a reward to whoever finds your dog. No one likes to think about losing a dog because of theft or straying, but if that should happen to you, certain insurance plans will reimburse you for the amount you paid for your dog. When your pet dies, some plans reimburse for the cost of your beloved dog’s burial or cremation. Dog health care insurance takes the worry and guesswork out of providing medical care for the best-loved member of your family: your dog.